How Much Do Siberian Huskies Cost?

Siberian Huskies are absolute beauties that you can’t help but fall in love with. You’ve probably thought about getting one but the idea of the cost has always dampened your spirit. 

But how much do Siberin Huskies really cost? 

Siberian Huskies can be quite expensive both in terms of initial acquisition and maintenance costs. The costs range between $800 and $1500. But before you commit or run away from this deal, let me share with you valuable insights that can help you make an informed decision. 

As a Siberian Husky enthusiast (a proud owner of 3 – Laika, Nova, and Leki), I want to share with you all that you need to know to become a successful husky parent. It’s my goal to enlighten as many passionate husky owners so that we grow a thriving and loving husky community. 

I’ll start by saying that the first step towards being a good husky parent is to know what you’re getting into. I’m not by any chance trying to intimidate you but this is something that will make your work easy down the road.

The adoption cost, vet bills, food, and training needs should form the bigger percentage of your preliminary research. 

There are several factors that determine how much Siberians are worth. You’ll need to think of all the separate costs constituting the total cost and determine whether you’re ready to incur the cost.

For instance, besides the acquisition cost, you’ll also require a fenced-in yard since huskies are naturally escaped, artists. 

You might need to incur other costs such as in obedience training, interactive toys that will keep the dog engaged so that it doesn’t get involved in destructive behavior. Read on to find out everything you need to know to uncover the ultimate cost of a Siberian Husky. 

Find out if a Siberian Husky is right for you

How Much Do Siberian Huskies Cost - I s A Husky Right For You

Before you start thinking of the costs, the first thing you’ll need to find out is if the dog’s temperament fits in well with your kind of lifestyle.

This breed is an active working dog with massive energy levels. It has a clever, independent, and athletic temperament that makes them want to take the lead in everything. They’re athletically stunning and attractive. 

But looks can be deceiving. 

You’ll need to master more than the dog’s physical appearance to be a responsible husky parent. Due to their loads of energy, the dogs require tons of exercise on a daily basis.

Another tip I’ve also found effective is to have plenty of mental enrichment activities that will ensure the dog doesn’t become bored quickly. 

Chewing, barking, digging, howling, and escaping are some of the behaviors that will characterize a Siberian Husky that’s left to its own devices. These nuisance behaviors can wreak havoc in your neighborhood.

Many people who weren’t equipped with such knowledge ended up hating huskies for thinking they’re stubborn and good-for-nothing dogs.

But so long as you’re a person that leads an active lifestyle, it should be fairly easy to get along with this breed. 

Siberians will make great companions if you like hiking, cross-country skiing, jogging, and other high-energy activities. Due to their thick coat, the huskies can survive just fine in cold and icy conditions.

As a matter of fact, this breed was originally intended for pulling sleds across cold and rugged terrains. That’s the number one reason these dogs thrive in environments that present them with loads of adventures. 

A quiet and sedentary kind of living isn’t the best environment for adventurous huskies.

They’ll give you a hard time if you live in city apartments but do well in rural suburban homes with plenty of space.

Buying a Sibeian Husky puppy

How Much Do Siberian Huskies Cost - Buying a Siberian Husky

I’ll always recommend that you research and work with a reputable breeder specializing in Siberian Huskies when it’s time to get your dog. The range of buying this puppy from a good breeder is $800 to $1500.

However, it’s not strange enough to find breeders asking for as much as $6000 for purebred puppies. 

Again, I need to stress that it’s important to check and crosscheck to ascertain that you’re working with a reputable breeder. It’s never a good idea to place an order for your Siberian Husky from an online merchant.

That’s a risky undertaking that exposes you to many vulnerabilities including buying from a backyard breeder or puppy mill.

I would strongly advise that you make two visits to the breeder before making the decision to buy from them. For the first visit, notify them of your intended visit and book an appointment with them.

During this visit, orient yourself with the breeder and ask all the big and small questions. Ask the breeder to show you the dog’s parents and avail the relevant documents including medical and genetic reports. 

After your first visit, you need to arrange another impromptu visit. The goal of this second visit is to see if the conditions you found at first were genuine or they were mere PR stands.

A breeder that’s got nothing to hide will not have any issues with you dropping by unannounced. If you like what you see, then it’s probably time to think about taking your selected husky companion home. 

How Much Huskies Cost In 30 States

If you have been wondering what could be the cost of a Siberian Husky in your state, here’s a table containing the average cost of a Husky by state.

I arrived at these prices after getting in touch with American breeders, and also after contacting multiple websites and classifieds.

Please note that these states have been listed in no particular order and we’ll be updating the table frequently.

Also, these are just averages and not the exact price you will pay for your new puppy.

S/NState (USA)Average Cost (USD)
1California$850-1200
2Oregon$800-1100
3Idaho$900
4Washington$800
5North Carolina$800-1000
6South Carolina$600-850
7West Virginia$750-900
8North Dakota$500-800
9Rhode island$600-800
10Minessatoa$800
11Wisconsin$600-800
12Kentucky$500-700
13Indiana$500-650
14Tennesee$600-800
15Michigan$650-750
16Montanna$800
17Delaware$800
18Wisconsin$600-800
19Pennsylvania$700-900
20Alabama$800
21Alaska$600-1000
22Arizona$900
23Arkansas$700
24Colorado$900
25Connecticut$650-750
26Florida$800-1300
27Georgia$1100
28Hawaii$600-800
29Illinois$700
30Iowa$750
How Much Do Siberian Huskies Cost

Consider adopting a Siberian Husky from a rescue or shelter

There’s a corrupted notion that dogs found in shelters and rescues are not worth taking into your home. That can’t be further from the truth as these two places are home to some of the finest dogs.

The dogs in these places are mere victims of circumstances and it’s not that they’re untrained, unsociable, or that kind of thing. 

In the case of Huskies, many of their parents surrender them to shelters or rescues when they find out that these dogs aren’t ideal for their kind of lifestyles.

You see, unlike you, many people out there don’t take the time to research properly before buying a dog. They learn their lessons the hard way and decide to surrender these dogs. 

So if you rule out rescues and shelters as your sources of a potential Husky, you might end up missing out on a lifetime opportunity to take home your dream dog at a friendly price.

There are countless Huskies looking for new forever parents, so give them a chance to prove themselves. 

There are even rescue organizations whose main responsibility is to find and match Huskies with their new parents. Siberian Husky Club of America Trust is one such example that can do a legit job of helping you find the right dog.

You can check out their website for detailed information on how they work as well as the benefits of working with them. 

Facebook groups and other social media platforms can be sources of reliable information you can use as you do your research. 

Lots of Huskies are surrendered by their owners because they need more exercise, training, and attention than their owners are expecting. Huskies are also notorious escape artists, so some of them get picked up as strays.

There are whole rescue organizations dedicated to finding new homes for Huskies in need.

If there’s a local animal shelter in your area, you can start your search there and see where the road leads you. 

You never know, it might even happen that you spend in the range of $70 to $300 as the acquisition cost when you work with animal shelters and rescues. 

The cost of caring for a Siberian Husky

How Much Do Siberian Huskies Cost - Cost of Caring for a Husky

Caring for your Husky will include costs such as medical care, food, and training. Since the breed has high energy requirements, you’ll need to buy only the best foods in the market.

The monthly food expenses will be anywhere between $40 to $50.

This cost is exclusive of supplements, treats, dental, vitamins, and chews. The average lifespan of a Siberian Husky is 12 to 14 years.

Obedience training for a Siberian Husky cost will vary from one trainer to another. The idea here is to find and work with a reputable trainer that’s within your budget.

But don’t see this as an optional expense as a well-behaved Husky will make your life enjoyable and fun. 

In case you prefer a puppy, it’s important that you enroll the puppy for socialization costs.

The cost will range from $70 to $200 depending on the trainer you’re working with. 

You might find trainers who offer group obedience classes while others will specialize in private training.

The way the options and see which one works best for you. Whichever the case, ensure you settle for a trainer that uses positive reinforcement methods when training your dog.

As for the grooming, you might have to part with up to $100 per single grooming session. 

Last words

So there you have it. With these insights, you’re now set to make an informed decision as far as becoming a Siberian Husky parent goes.

On average, be set to spend anything between $800 and $1500 although there are exceptions that can see you cough out as much as $6000. It all depends on your budget and priorities.

Whichever the case, I wish you the very best as you search for the Siberian Husky of your dreams. 

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